Hallowe’en Safety

The local police shared some Hallowe’en safety tips with the students in our school district.
  • See and be seen. Make sure drivers can see you. Wear reflective clothing or place reflective tape on the front and back of costumes and clothing. Make glow sticks part of your costume and carry a flashlight.
  • Are fake swords part of your costume? Make sure they look fake, but remember, some people still may not be able to tell the difference.
  • Safety in numbers. Walk in groups and stay together.
  • Stay on the outside. Never enter a house and only accept treats at the front door.
  • Use crosswalks whenever possible. Visit houses on one side of the street at a time and cross the street only at intersections or at marked crosswalks.
  • Save your treats. Wait until you get home before sampling your treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should check out all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
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Things To Consider For A Safe Hallowe’en

halloween1

The local police shared some Hallowe’en safety tips with the students in our school district.

  • See and be seen. Make sure drivers can see you. Wear reflective clothing or place reflective tape on the front and back of costumes and clothing. Make glow sticks part of your costume and carry a flashlight.
  • Are fake swords part of your costume? Make sure they look fake, but remember, some people still may not be able to tell the difference.
  • Safety in numbers. Walk in groups and stay together.
  • Stay on the outside. Never enter a house and only accept treats at the front door.
  • Use crosswalks whenever possible. Visit houses on one side of the street at a time and cross the street only at intersections or at marked crosswalks.
  • Save your treats. Wait until you get home before sampling your treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should check out all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
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How To Be Safe On Hallowe’en

Halloween_spider-500x500

The local police shared some Hallowe’en safety tips with the students in our school district.

  • See and be seen. Make sure drivers can see you. Wear reflective clothing or place reflective tape on the front and back of costumes and clothing. Make glow sticks part of your costume and carry a flashlight.
  • Are fake swords part of your costume? Make sure they look fake, but remember, some people still may not be able to tell the difference.
  • Safety in numbers. Walk in groups and stay together.
  • Stay on the outside. Never enter a house and only accept treats at the front door.
  • Use crosswalks whenever possible. Visit houses on one side of the street at a time and cross the street only at intersections or at marked crosswalks.
  • Save your treats. Wait until you get home before sampling your treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should check out all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
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Hallowe’en – Safety

Pumpkin

The local police shared some Hallowe’en safety tips with the students in our school district.

  • See and be seen. Make sure drivers can see you. Wear reflective clothing or place reflective tape on the front and back of costumes and clothing. Make glow sticks part of your costume and carry a flashlight.
  • Are fake swords part of your costume? Make sure they look fake, but remember, some people still may not be able to tell the difference.
  • Safety in numbers. Walk in groups and stay together.
  • Stay on the outside. Never enter a house and only accept treats at the front door.
  • Use crosswalks whenever possible. Visit houses on one side of the street at a time and cross the street only at intersections or at marked crosswalks.
  • Save your treats. Wait until you get home before sampling your treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should check out all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.

 

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Mandarin Oranges From Asia

Did you know that unwrapping Mandarin oranges is a Canadian holiday tradition we’ve been enjoying for over 120 years? Oranges travelled by ship and were packed in wooden crates, hand tied in pairs to form a bundle. The crates were quickly unloaded and shipped across the country by orange trains. The brightly painted orange boxcars let everyone along the way know that the Mandarins had arrived and with them the start of the holiday season. These sturdy wooden crates were a favourite gift to give and receive, and once the oranges were eaten, they became instant sleds, tool boxes, and dollhouses.

Mandarin oranges gained their name from the bright orange robes worn by the mandarins, public officials of the ancient Chinese court. When exporting began, Mandarin oranges were named after their port of origin. Tangerines were the first to be exported to North America and were named after the city of Tangiers in Morocco. 

 

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Class Art Projects

Over the last few weeks we have used the technique of Printmaking to create a Christmas or Winter scene. The students also used construction paper and a tracing of their foot and hands to make their own reindeer. With watercolours, black tempera paint and a straw they made some beautiful Autumn trees. A special thanks to the parents who helped us in the classroom. The Printmaking is being displayed on the bulletin board by the office during the month of December.

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In Flanders Fields by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Written by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae on May 3, 1915 in Ypres, Begium

 

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